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Can I Bring Trees Home from the Forest in Oregon?

It’s the perfect time of year to get out and explore nature. What better way to take it all in than with a stroll through one of Oregon’s breathtaking forests? You may even find yourself wanting to take a piece of it home with you.

But can you cut down an Oregon forest tree and transplant it into your own yard? The short answer to your question is yes. But before you go grabbing your ax, Johnny Appleseed, there are some things you should know first. Allow the expert team at Mr. Tree to bring you up to speed.

Obtain a Permit

While you can bring home Oregon forest trees, you more than likely will need to obtain a permit to do so. The first step is to figure out which forest you would like to visit. The US Department of Agriculture Forest Service provides a list of national forests in the Pacific Northwest. Simply click on the forest you are interested in to visit its website.

The permit you’ll want to obtain will most likely be called the “special forest products” permit. For some products, permits are free, but others will require that you pay a small fee. In some instances, the requirement to obtain a permit may be waived. The best thing to do is contact the office for the forest you are interested in visiting for the most up-to-date information on permit requirements.

If you’re looking to cut down a tree for the holidays, you will most likely need to secure a special Christmas tree permit. You can purchase Christmas tree permits from Recreation.gov. Simply type the name of the forest you want to visit into the search bar to look up information on fees and season dates.

Know the Rulesmr-tree-can-i-bring-trees-home-from-the-forest-in-oregon

Securing the proper permit is only the first step. You will also need to become acquainted with all the rules governing which Oregon forest trees can be cut down and which ones must be left undisturbed. When you purchase your permit, you will receive guidelines on all the rules governing what type of trees you can cut down and from which areas of the forest.

For instance, you must avoid tree cutting on private land or in research areas, wilderness areas, scenic areas, and any areas with rare, threatened, or endangered plant species. You may also need to stay a certain distance away from other areas, such as trails, campgrounds, and lakes.

Each forest will also have limitations on the type and size of tree you can cut down, as well as the quantity that can be removed based on your permit. You should also keep in mind that you need to cut down the whole tree. You are prohibited from removing only the top half of the tree and leaving the stump of the tree behind. Since guidelines vary from forest to forest, be sure to request the complete set of guidelines to be followed.

Take Proper Safety Precautions

Tree cutting can be a risky business. Trust us, we know. So be sure you are adequately prepared with the proper tools and safety gear before embarking on your forest adventure.
First, make sure you have a full tank of gas and that you’re fully stocked with snacks and water. Get a map from the forest office so you can plot out the path you’re going to take through the forest. Another good reason to bring along a map is that you may have poor cell service in the forest and may not be able to rely on your phone’s GPS.

Always be sure someone knows where you are going and when you plan to return in case you run into any trouble along the way. It’s a good idea to plan for an early day and leave the forest before it gets dark. Also, be sure to check the weather and travel conditions before your trip. If you are planning a trip to the forest during wintertime, bring along a shovel, tire chains, and a tow chain since some forest roads may not be plowed.

You’ll also want to make sure you have the proper safety gear for cutting the tree down. Bring gloves, goggles, a handsaw, and loppers to trim any unruly branches. You should also bring along a first-aid kit in case of injury.

When selecting your tree, try to choose one from a densely populated area. This will help the remaining trees have more room to grow. Remember to remove the tree in its entirety. It may be helpful to bring along measuring tape so you can measure how much room you have in the bed of your truck to transport the tree or rope if you plan to secure your tree to the top of your vehicle. That leads us to our next and final step.

Secure the Tree for Transport

Once you’ve found the right tree and you’ve cut it down, the hard work isn’t over just yet. You’ll need to carry your tree out of the forest and secure it to your car for transport. Since dragging your tree can sometimes rub off needles, leaves, and bark, you may want to consider bringing a tarp with you to wrap it up. A tarp can also protect the tree from wind damage on the return trip.

Whether you’re looking for the perfect Christmas tree or an ornamental tree to adorn your front yard, an Oregon forest tree can certainly spruce up any home. But keep in mind that cutting down and transporting trees can be demanding work.

If you want to leave it to the pros, give Mr. Tree a call. We specialize in tree removal, transport, and other residential and commercial tree services. If you need a little help finding, removing, and transplanting an Oregon forest tree, we’re here to help you get the job done.