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9 Tree Idioms for When You’re Feeling “Out of Your Tree” This Winter

It’s normal to feel a little stir crazy in the winter, especially when you’re stuck in the house. You don’t get to frolic in your yard or enjoy the outdoors in the same way. And it makes people get a little restless—and a little creative in describing their feelings.

When we’re starting to feel that way at Mr. Tree, we begin cycling through our favorite tree idioms. Some people may even say we’re “out of our tree” because of it, or if we’re getting technical, a little crazy.

But there’s a tree idiom for nearly every situation. Here are a few of our favorites when you’re feeling out of your tree.

#1. The Apple Doesn’t Fall Far from the Tree

Most people resemble their parents in some way or another. Maybe it’s in the way they look or the way they act, but some type of similarity is usually there. When people say that “the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree,” they’re usually referencing the similarities between family members. Children will often turn out like their parents, so in this idiom, the apple is the child and the tree is the parent.

#2. Bark Up the Wrong Tree

Have you ever watched someone try and try again at something you know they’ll never figure out? If so, you can use this tree idiom to even further confuse them.

“Don’t go barking up the wrong tree,” is a phrase used to tell someone that they’re nowhere close to what they’re looking for, or that they’re spending a lot of time searching in the wrong direction. It’s in reference to the way that dogs can sometimes bark at a tree in an effort to chase prey. It’s really just a different way to tell them that they’re wasting their time.

#3. Like Trying to Nail Jell-O to a Tree

If you know anything about Jell-O, you know that it has a very unique texture. You also know that nailing it to a tree won’t hold for very long. When you say this idiom, you’ll be referencing something that you know won’t stick. You could be talking about someone’s relationship or a new hobby maybe. Some people just won’t stick to the things they try to do, not unlike the permeable nature of Jell-O.

#4. Tight as the Bark on a Tree

There are some people who feel handmade for you. It could be your spouse, a friend, or even a dog. To say that you’re “as tight as bark on a tree” means that you are as close as humanly possible. Nothing hugs a tree quite like its bark, and getting between the bark and a tree can be a difficult task. This saying could be a new way for you to put to words how close your closest relationship really is.

#5. Go Climb a Tree

With so much time indoors, it can feel like there’s no way to escape the people in your house. Not saying that you want to necessarily escape from them, but there are fewer places to retreat to when you’re feeling a little out of your tree.

Though we can’t provide you with an oasis, we can offer you a new way to tell them to bug off. Saying “go climb a tree” is the equivalent of telling someone to get lost. And maybe they’ll find climbing a tree to be a fun activity, so long as the trees in your yard are well-maintained thanks to companies like Mr. Tree.

#6. Money Doesn’t Grow on Trees

Maybe it’s your kids or your spouse who likes to spend money like it doesn’t take work to earn it. Those people often need a reminder that you can’t spend money without consequence, which gives you a good opportunity to say this tree idiom. “Money doesn’t grow on trees” references that money won’t just replenish itself after you spend it. You pick a fruit, you leave the tree alone for a while, and a new fruit will eventually replace the old one. Money, unfortunately, doesn’t work like that.

#7. A Tree Is Known By Its Fruitmr-tree-how-to-take-the-best-care-of-apple-trees

Some people can talk a good talk, but not everyone can walk the walk. That’s the basic meaning of this tree idiom. Saying that “a tree is known by its fruit” is referring to the way that people are best known for their actions or what they produce. The fruit is proof of the work you’ve been putting in and, without it, can you even call yourself a fruit tree?

#8. Knock on Wood

If you’re feeling a little superstitious this winter, you might benefit from this tree idiom. “Knocking on wood” is an idiom people like to use to avoid any kind of bad luck. For example, if someone says that this winter hasn’t been too bad, they’ll often follow it up by saying, “Knock on wood,” and then actually knock on wood so that they avoid jinxing the situation. Not that saying the winter is mild will cause it to turn harsh, but you might want to knock on wood just in case.

#9. Go Out On a Limb

Going out of your comfort zone can be a great way to expand your horizons. To say that you’re “going out on a limb” refers to saying or doing something that’s a little bit risky or out of the norm. When you imagine actually going out on a limb, an image comes to your head of a shaking branch, barely able to support the weight of a bird. As a human, going out on a limb can be a sure way to take a big fall, but it can also provide you an amazing view and the potential for great opportunities.